Baamboozle

Baamboozle is a tool that allows you to create games for your classes. The tool is very easy to use. It is free so just sign up and start creating your game for your class. You can also use the games existed on Baamboozle. Browse the library and choose the most suitable game to play. You can assign different point values for each question depending on the difficulty of the question. You can edit later. You can make your game public or private.
You can use the games to warm up, energize your classes. You can review or introduce a new topic. It can be used as an assessment tool. You can create games for vocabulary and grammar revision or reading comprehension.

What I liked most?
The players don’t choose from the options provided by the teacher. They must produce their own answers. Study mode permits the students to revise before the game.

Once you are ready to play you can divide your class into teams and then choose the game option and play.

MapCrunch for the Class

newspaper

Today’s learners are way too visual than us. That’s why we tend to decorate our classes with posters, notes, post-it notes, charts, etc. They are so used to seeing everything by googling that if you try to describe it using words they understand nothing.

I came across with MapCrunch today and I thought it can be very useful with our visual but less verbal students in our tech savvy classes. MapCrunch virtually takes you to a random place in the world. You can find imagery captured by Google in 40 countries.

How to use?

Just click the “GO” button to be taken to a random place in the world. You can choose whether you want to see an urban image or an image of a place. You can click on  the tour button and have a very quick 360 degrees tour around the place.

If you only want to see certain countries, select them on the right hand panel or click the “myMap” option on the top-right of side panel and type the city you want to see particularly and click on “GO” Click on the arrows to tour around the image.

How can you use mapcrunch in the class?

  1. If you are reading a text about a certain place or a story which takes place in one of these 40 countries then show the city to your students just to make them to visualize. We did it for Wales and they loved the idea.
  2. To describe places
  3. To write descriptive essays.
  4. To practise prepositions or modals of deduction.
  5. To compare the place you live to the area on the image.
  6. To write a compare and contrast essay on two different places. The place where you live and the image on the whiteboard.
  7. You can ask your students to write a story which takes place in the area.
  8. To give directions.

 

Eveline vs Edna, Reading Short Stories in Class

Another short story I love reading with my students is Eveline from Dubliners. I know it is difficult to understand Joyce for a teenager yet when guided, students get something from Dubliners. I have tried Eveline and Araby and they worked well.

I’d like to share what I do with ‘Eveline’.

Describe Ireland, Dublin and Dubliners at the beginning of the 20th century.

Create a glogster

Add links and ask students to research and tell you what they’ve come up with.

Talk about women’s place in society

Talk about daughters’ place in families.

Talk about unemployment. Causes and results.

How can unemployment change a person?

Introduce vocabulary.

Create a wordle of the story.

Put students in groups and ask them to guess the story.

Read the story and discuss your questions.

As a follow up, distribute a handout with the 1st paragraph of the story on.

Tell students to continue the story and adapt it to 21st century. I’m sure their Eveline will be more courageous.

Tell them to digitalise their story.

They can create a slideshow, glogster, comic or an animation.

Here you can see what I had previously wrote about ‘Eveline’

After reading Eveline then Enoch’s Two Letters by Alan Sillitoe, one of the angry young men of literature, I realized we can compare the two women in these two stories, Eveline and Edna. When I choose to read Eveline in class, I usually continue with Enoch’s Two Letters.

After we read the story, I tell my students to compare and contrast Eveline and Edna

  • They can write an essay
  • Create posters (glogster) describing two women, highlighting their differences.
  • They can write a pop song comparing Eveline and Edna.

A handout for Eveline and Enoch’s Two Letters

And I will also be glad if you share your ideas 🙂