Posted in 1st day activity, 1st week activities, asking questions, fillers, warmers

Asking Questions – A Warmer or A Filler

I found this activity hidden in one of my idea notebooks a few minutes ago while trying to organize my files.

Ask students to write a question on a piece of paper.

Tell them to fold it down and pass it to the next student.

The next students will also write a question and fold the paper and pass it to the next student.

This will continue until the students get their own papers.

Then tell students to choose

1. a funny question

2. the question they’d like to answer

3. a question they can’t answer

4 . a question with a a grammar mistake, etc

Then they can answer the questions they want to answer.

They can create a wall poster titled “Our Questions and Answers’

I also think this can be a great idea as pre (reading, listening,writing, speaking,etc)

Write the topic on the board

Tell students to write a question on that topic and pass the paper to the next students

When they get their own papers tell them to check the text if they can get an answer for any of the questions on the paper.

or

If you have access to a computer room, before reading the text in the course book, students can search the web and try to get answers for their questions.

 

Posted in asking indirect questions, drill, exercises, lesson idea

Asking Indirect Questions

 

The following activity was something spontaneous when we did ‘indirect questions’ but then I felt the students still needed practice, something more like a mechanical drill but I was not prepared for more exercises so I did the folllowing.

I told mys sts to have 4 slips of paper.

On each paper, I told them to write 2 wh questions and 2 yes-no questions.

While they were writing their questions, on some slips of paper I wrote indirect question beginnings, such as ‘I’d like to know ….’ ‘ Do you know ….’, etc.

On my desk, I put their questions and my beginnings face-down as two different card decks.

I told sts they would take 1 card from each pile and write the indirect question on the board.

As homework, I told them to change the indirect questions to direct questions.

More follow-ups

If you have a creative, enthusiastic students, you can even tell them to choose 3 indirect questions from the board and improvise a dialogue but unfortunately my sts need to be prepared for that stage for some time and I’m hopeful 😉

Posted in asking questions, fun activities

Asking Questions, some fun activities

whySometimes questions are more important than answers. Nancy Willard

I sometimes feel one of the most ignored area in my classroom is practising asking questions. When I started teaching English, there was a trendy activity to ask questions. That was Find the question for the underlined answer which was very mechanical and boring and while checking my blog posts I realised I never wrote about asking questions in a fun way so I’ll list here some activities, games I use in class.

whyfunnyface

 

What’s the Question?

Level: Any Level

Purpose: review question forms

Divide the class into two teams.

Tell students they will find the correct question for the answer.

Have two players come to the front  (one from each team)

Have a buzzer or a bell or they can just touch the desk if you don’t have the formers.

Read an answer to a question and say, ‘What’s the question?’ The fastest player to find a correct question wins a point

Dice Questions

level: any

materials: a pair of  dice

Elicit 6 topics you studied, such as:

1. family

2. school

3. food

4. music

5. books

6. inventions

Elicit the question words

1. what

2. where

3. when

4. why

5. who

6. how

Put students in 2 teams and tell if their team can form a correct question they will gain 2 points.

Throw the dice.

Students should ask a question according to the numbers on the dice so the dice say 2;4. The student will choose the topic from the first group in the list above number 2 is school and the question word will be number 4, in this case it is why.

20 questions

This one is a classic but can be a fun way to practice asking questions and have a look at Larry Ferlazzo’s post using it with an online treat.

DO YOU KNOW YOUR BEST FRIEND?

Level: any

Aim: to revise asking questions

Materials: pen and paper

Send 2 good friends out

In class decide what questions to ask such as

what is your friend’s favourite colour?

Who is your friend’s favourite super hero?

Call one of the students back and ask the questions, take notes. send him back and call the other one in and ask the same questions.

Call both of them and ask the questions to them to get their answers, compare with the friend’s answer.

The winner is the one who has more correct answers.